Goodbye Happy

Happy Rabbit

My apartment feels very empty tonight.

A couple of weeks ago, I reluctantly posted an ad online looking for someone to take the rabbit and hamster. I’m leaving in three weeks, so they needed a new home. After very little initial interest, a man replied a few days ago to say that he wanted a female rabbit to accompany his male one.

This afternoon, the man – who is Bangladeshi – and his Chinese girlfriend came round to pick them up. The rabbit looked unhappy about being put in a cage. I won’t miss the hamster too much. He’s a crazy, feral little thing – always trying to escape and hide. But the rabbit is beautiful. She would make a lot of noise by scratching and knocking over her food bowl, so I was always aware that she was here, even when I wasn’t doing anything with her.

Baby Rabbit

H bought the rabbit when it was about the size of a can of Coke. We met for lunch in a Sizzlers steak restaurant in Wangjing and he had it in his bag in a tiny cage. He’d been threatening to buy a rabbit for some time, but I dissuaded him because I had a feeling that I’d end up looking after it. And that’s exactly what happened. H has been gone for a long time, and now the rabbit’s gone too.

The good news is that the couple who took the animals seem like they will be better at caring for them than I was. Since I started the summer camp job, I haven’t played with them as much as I used to. So, it’s all for the best.

Some unrelated things:

  • A student told me that the Chinese name for the Union Jack is 米字旗, which means ‘Rice Flag’. The crosses on the flag look like the Chinese character for rice. I used to see the Union Jack all the time on clothing, but it seems to be less popular now. I often see the Scottish flag though. Perhaps Chinese clothing manufacturers are trying to tell us something about Scottish independence.
  • Yet again, I heard from someone about how she hates South Korea because ‘the Koreans’ are trying to steal Chinese culture. According to this common view, the Koreans (all of them?) have claimed that Confucius and Chairman Mao were Korean.  Additionally, the Koreans (again, all of them?) have tried to copyright or otherwise claim ownership of traditional Chinese medicine and various Chinese holidays and foods. It’s all tabloid nonsense but what amazes me is that anyone could believe that the Koreans are trying to claim Chairman Mao as one of their own. Communism is illegal in South Korea. South Korea fought against Mao’s troops in the Korean war. Why would they want him? Yet, these clearly ludicrous stories are enough for some to justify hating an entire country and its people. It’s like if I declared that I hated France and all French people because I read on a few blogs that ‘the French’ are trying to steal Henry VIII, Guy Fawkes night and fish & chips. So ridiculous.

Today is Mid-Autumn Day. Have a good day.

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